Target Scoring Practice #1

In Bullseye, you will be scoring your neighbor’s target, writing that score on both the score card and also the target, and then moving to your target to check the score you were given by your other neighbor.

And in scoring his target and in verifying yours, there is a procedure to follow that makes things easier, or at least it usually makes it so.

Here’s the procedure many shooters use.

  1. Ask the shooter what caliber and bullet type he is shooting. This will determine which overlay you will use if in doubt. Also, because “ball” ammunition leaves a smaller hole but is the same size as its “wad” counterpart, you’ll need to take that into account as you eyeball the target. (Plugs should only be used by match officials and, once inserted, cannot be removed until the score is agreed upon.)
  2. Determine how many shots are to be counted as fired at the target. Note this is not necessarily how many shots were fired. For example, if the shooter fired an alibi and a total of fourteen shots, you would throw away the four best scores and keep the remaining ten even if some of them were misses. But if the shooter’s gun jammed during the alibi string itself and only thirteen shots were fired, you still “count” the shots as fourteen, and throw away the best four. (You don’t get an alibi on an alibi string.)
  3. At the target, count the holes to see if you can find all of the shots. If so, you’re ready to begin the tally. If not, look carefully at the holes for elongations or overlapping but slightly offset shots. Note that a skidder will be elongated horizontally and that the beginning of the hole will be much narrower than the caliber’s diameter. Two shots almost in the same hole, on the other hand, will also be elongated but the roundness at the elongated point will be the same as the bullet’s caliber.
  4. Tally the shots starting at the X ring and moving outward. Count the number of Xs and, on the score card, write an X for each of them. Then count the tens, write down that many tens, then the nines and so forth. The score card might look like this: X, X, 10, 10, 10, 9, 9, 7, 7, 7.
  5. Sometimes, however, it will be easier to start at the low end and work your way in toward the center.
  6. And at other times, you may find it easy to score all the holes except one large ragged hole with multiple strikes. By scoring the other holes first, you’ll know how many to look for in the ragged hole by carefully examining the edges for each bullet’s outline.
  7. And finally, you will sometimes just have to look at that one big hole and decide if any bullets passed through the center of it leaving no mark, or if it is more likely the shooter missed the paper completely. Most scorers will give the shooter the benefit of the doubt if all the holes are near the middle of the target with no flyers. On the other hand, if the target has a couple of wild shots, you may decide it is likely the missing shots are completely off the paper. As the scorer, use your best judgment in making the decision. (A miss is recorded as “M” — Maggie’s drawers — on the score card.)
  8. With the record shots recorded on the score card, you then compute the score. This is usually done by counting how many points less than 10 each shot gets. For example, if there were two shots in the X ring, five shots in the ten ring, two in the nine ring and one in the eight, that would be 4 points less than 100, or 96. And then count the Xs, in this case 2X. The score card would be: X, X, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 9, 9, 8 = 96-2.
  9. And on the target’s repair center, write that same score, 96-2.
  10. You can then move to your target, look at the score written on the repair center and tally your own score to see if you agree. If not, ask the scorer to recheck. And if the two of you still disagree, then you can challenge the score — usually costing a buck or two — and the match officials will settle the issue.

Here are some targets on which to practice. (The caliber and bullet type are included in each target’s caption.) The targets progress from easy to hard. After you’ve scored all the targets, add a comment to this posting with the individual scores for the six targets along with any comments you might wish to make.

Target #1


Target #1 *

45 ACP Ball

(Click the image to enlarge)

Target #2


Target #2

45 ACP Wadcutter

(Click the image to enlarge)

Target #3


Target #3

45 ACP Ball

(Click the image to enlarge)

Target #4


Target #4

45 ACP Wadcutter

(Click the image to enlarge)

Target #5


Target #5

45 ACP Wadcutter

(Click the image to enlarge)

Target #6


Target #6

45 ACP Wadcutter

(Click the image to enlarge)

____________________

* Note:
This image had a 90 degree rotation when first displayed. The image editor I use to crop and resize before uploading, Paint.NET, displayed it correctly so I assumed blogger was doing something. But the evidence of “right” and “wrong” was misleading.

After some research, I discovered that “portrait” versus “landscape” orientations are encoded in the original JPG data by the camera itself. (I’m using a Nikon CoolPix S210 for most of my stills. This issue reportedly happens with some Canon digital cameras as well.)

The image editor (Paint.NET) ignores this information as does blogger. They simply pass it through (ignored and) unchanged. But the browser in which the image is finally displayed apparently uses that information and, hence, displays it accordingly.

Here’s what I did to fix it. First, save the image as a PNG (*.png). This will remove the orientation information. You can upload and use that image on blogger.

Additionally, you can then edit the new image (the PNG) and re-save it as a JPG. Because the PNG format does not retain the rotation information, the JPG created from it also won’t have that information. When you then upload and display the resultant JPG (or the PNG), the orientation should then be correct.

 

6 thoughts on “Target Scoring Practice #1

  1. Here's my tally.

    1: 98-6. Note these are "ball" bullets and leave deceptively small holes. The 4 o'clock is a 10.

    2: 98-3. The rule is "Point of entry plus one" for sliders that mark more than one scoring ring.

    3: 100-6. Check the edges carefully for the four bullets that went through the big hole.

    4: 96-4. The clearly-X hole is a double (I think).

    5: Is this 98 or 99? and is it 3X or 4X? Tough call. I'd spend a buck for a challenge if it was scored less than 99-4.

    6: 98-2. My "benefit of the doubt" goes to the shooter on this one.

  2. Target 1, 2 & 6 are hard to score from the images. I use overlays and an Eagle Eye magnifier to give the shooter my fairest attempt at scoring. I agree that ball and JHP's are the hardest to score. I check and re-check my scoring for ball matches especially, leg points and presidents 100 cutoffs can come down to single points and X's.

    William Foley
    Wichita, KS

  3. I've never scored one of these before. The scoring system seems really stupid, i.e. missing the target completely is just as bad as hitting the "9" ring, if I'm understanding this correctly.

    1: 97-6 (I think the 4 o'clock is a 9. It does not look like the circumference of the hole quite intersects with the circumference of the 10 circle.)

    2: 98-3 (What's up with the trajectory of the bullet that hit the middle? Was he shooting from way over on the left side of the target?)

    3: 100-6 (It kind of looks like 11 shots were fired on this one with 4 in the big cluster in the center and 3 in the cluster below, but I'm assuming 10 were fired at each of these example targets and gave him the benefit of the doubt.)

    4: 96-2 (I think one shot did not hit the target. Of the two questionable Xs, I counted the one to the left as an X and the one to the right as a 10.)

    5: 98-4 (Looks like he might have missed the target once, but I gave benefit of doubt that he hit the X a 4th time.)

    6: 98-2 (On the big cluster on the left, it appears that it consists of 6 holes – 3 on the left, 1 in the middle, and 2 on the right.)

    I make my own overlays at home.

  4. Dear Nubbie Wumpus,
    Each target has 10 shots and 10 holes but, with the better shooters, there is a much higher probability of shots tearing a large hole and later rounds passing through it without leaving a mark. The "gentleman's rule" (and the official rule) is to give the benefit of the doubt to the shooter, especially the good shooters.
    The elongated hole in #2 is an early or a late shot on the turning target (which I neglected to note).
    You did a good job scoring that!

  5. Oh yeah, 100-8 beats 99-9. The numerical score is ranked first and, only if there is a tie, is the X count used.
    I put a buck in my personal "Cool Parts Fund" for each X I shoot.

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