Tri-Brain

20130505-095208.jpgBullseye shooters have three brains.

The Doing Brain

This brain rides the bicycle, throws the ball, drives the car and makes the shot. It knows how to coordinate eye, hand, arm and foot so everything acts in concert. It works best if left to its own. It can learn new things by imitation but it needs repetition to get it down. And while you can do other things while riding or driving, don’t talk to the Doing brain while it’s doing. Just let it “do” and everything will come out fine.

The Thinking Brain

This brain solves problems. It analyzes actions and results. It decides good/bad and then comes up with lots of ways that might improve the results or make the task easier. This brain works well when it has lots of input to consider. It can use the advice of experts, precise measurements and the observation and memory of actual experience. It loves to tweak and tune, always with a reasoned analysis of why this or that should work better. And it is often, but not always, right.

The Meta-Brain

This brain over-sees the other two. It gives instructions and guides the others as to what “we” are going to accomplish.

The meta-brain is the one that helped get homework done when you were in school. It would guide Thinking brain into action for analysis and memorization while calming Doing brain who wanted to go outside to run, play catch or ride a bicycle.

Meta-brain would say, “Let’s have Doing brain watch for a minute while Thinking brain tells us the problem we need to do and how we might do it. Then, we’ll let Doing brain do that while Thinking brain watches to see how the idea works out. You’ll each get your turn and, when it’s the other brain’s turn, you’ll need to wait quietly. But each of you will get another turn and, if necessary, another after that until we’re all satisfied with the outcome.”

In Bullseye, the meta-brain coaches each shot or each Timed or Rapid string. It might go like this.

“OK, guys, we’re going to release one Slow Fire shot now. Thinking brain, can we have a brief replay of a perfect release with a perfect follow-through so Doing brain is clear on what is supposed to happen? Let’s watch that now, please.”

[Experience playback happens.]

“Thank you, Thinking brain. That was great. Please take notes now while Doing brain performs. It’s his turn.”

“Doing brain, we just relived the experience from Thinking brain. Wasn’t that absolutely perfect?

“It’s your turn now to actually release the shot. We won’t interfere because we know that if something’s not right, you will stop the action. Regardless, we know we’re really going to enjoy what you will do.

“OK, quiet on the set, please. Lights, camera and … Action!”

[The shot is made all the way through putting the gun down and the final, “Done,” from Doing brain.]

“Very good. Thank you Doing brain. That was wonderful to watch, didn’t you think so, Thinking brain?”

At this point, Thinking brain might want to look through the spotting scope to confirm what Doing brain saw and then all three share a group hug for a perfectly executed shot plan.

“Great work, guys. You each did your part so they went together perfectly!”

Then again, and perhaps only after a nervous glance at each other, a hearty laugh may erupt over some boo-boo. It happens. We all know it didn’t go right. So have a good laugh and then move on to the next shot.

Each brain has its part to play in this process.

Meta-brain orchestrates the other two, telling them when to act, when to be quiet and also setting the example of a positive attitude for each of the others to follow.

Thinking brain runs the rehearsal and, when needed, the error correction, but only when Doing brain is not busy.

When Doing brain is busy performing, the other two sit back quietly and watch. Doing brain knows how to get the job done. All it needs is to be left alone to do it.

Doing brain needs Thinking brain to help it do better while Meta-brain coordinates the two, letting each have its turn and making the whole experience fun and pleasurable.

“Great work, team!”

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